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dc.creatorYu, Chenglong 
dc.creatorArcos-Burgos, Mauricio 
dc.creatorBaune, Bernhard T. 
dc.creatorArolt, Volker 
dc.creatorDannlowski, Udo 
dc.creatorWong, Ma-Li 
dc.creatorLicinio, Julio 
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-24T21:00:42Z
dc.date.available2019-09-24T21:00:42Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn2158-3188
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/20331
dc.description.abstractMajor depressive disorder (MDD) is a common but serious psychiatric disorder with significant levels of morbidity and mortality. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on common variants increase our understanding of MDD; however, the underlying genetic basis remains largely unknown. Many studies have been proposed to explore the genetics of complex diseases from a viewpoint of the "missing heritability" by considering low-frequency and rare variants, copy-number variations, and other types of genetic variants. Here we developed a novel computational and statistical strategy to investigate the "missing heritability" of MDD. We applied Hamming distance on common, low-frequency, and rare single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sets to measure genetic distance between two individuals, and then built the multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) pictures. Whole-exome genotyping data from a Los Angeles Mexican-American cohort (203 MDD and 196 controls) and a European-ancestry cohort (473 MDD and 497 controls) were examined using our proposed methodology. MDS plots showed very significant separations between MDD cases and healthy controls for low-frequency SNP set (P value < 2.2e-16) and rare SNP set (P value = 7.681e-12). Our results suggested that low-frequency and rare variants may play more significant roles in the genetics of MDD. © 2018 The Author(s).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofTranslational Psychiatry, ISSN:2158-3188, Vol. 8 (2018)
dc.relation.urihttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41398-018-0117-7.pdf
dc.subjectCalifornia
dc.subjectControlled Study
dc.subjectEuropean American
dc.subjectGenetic Analysis
dc.subjectGenetic Variability
dc.subjectGenotype
dc.subjectHamming Distance
dc.subjectHeritability
dc.subjectHuman
dc.subjectMajor Clinical Study
dc.subjectMajor Depression
dc.subjectMexican American
dc.subjectSingle Nucleotide Polymorphism
dc.subjectStatistical Analysis
dc.subjectWhole Exome Sequencing
dc.subjectEstudio controlado
dc.subjectAmericana Europea
dc.subject.ddcEnfermedades 
dc.subject.lembDepresión mental
dc.subject.lembVariación genética
dc.titleLow-frequency and rare variants may contribute to elucidate the genetics of major depressive disorder
dc.typearticle
dc.subject.keywordControlled Study
dc.subject.keywordArticle
dc.subject.keywordEuropean American
dc.subject.keywordHamming Distance
dc.subject.keywordGenotype
dc.rights.accesRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.spaArtículo
dc.rights.accesoAbierto (Texto Completo)
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.source.bibliographicCitationKessler, R.C., Lifetime and 12-month prevalence of DSM-III-R psychiatric disorders in the United States (1994) Results from the National Comorbidity Survey. Arch. Gen. Psychiatry, 51, pp. 8-19
dc.contributor.gruplacGENIUROS
dc.creator.googleYu, Chenglong
dc.creator.googleArcos-Burgos, Mauricio
dc.creator.googleBaune, Bernhard T.
dc.creator.googleArolt, Volker
dc.creator.googleDannlowski, Udo
dc.creator.googleWong, Ma.-Li
dc.creator.googleLicinio, Julio
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41398-018-0117-7
dc.relation.citationTitleTranslational Psychiatry
dc.relation.citationVolumeVol. 8


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