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dc.creatorGonzalez-M, Roy 
dc.creatorGarcía, Hernando 
dc.creatorIsaacs, Paola 
dc.creatorCuadros, Hermes 
dc.creatorLópez-Camacho, Rene 
dc.creatorRodríguez, Nelly 
dc.creatorPerez, Karen 
dc.creatorMijares, Francisco 
dc.creatorCastano-Naranjo, Alejandro 
dc.creatorJurado, Ruben 
dc.creatorIdarraga-Piedrahíta, Alvaro 
dc.creatorRojas, Alicia 
dc.creatorVergara, Hernando 
dc.creatorPizano, Camila 
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-02T21:05:56Z
dc.date.available2019-10-02T21:05:56Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1748-9318
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/20381
dc.descriptionTropical dry forests (TDFs) have been defined as a single biome occurring mostly in the lowlands where there is a marked period of drought during the year. In the Neotropics, dry forests occur across contrasting biogeographical regions that contain high beta diversity and endemism, but also strong anthropogenic pressures that threaten their biodiversity and ecological integrity. In Colombia, TDFs occur across six regions with contrasting soils, climate, and anthropogenic pressures, therefore being ideal for studying how these variables relate to dry forest species composition, successional stage and conservation status. Here, we explore the variation in climate and soil conditions, floristic composition, forest fragment size and shape, successional stage and anthropogenic pressures in 571 dry forest fragments across Colombia. We found that TDFs should not be classified solely on rainfall seasonality, as high variation in precipitation and temperature were correlated with soil characteristics. In fact, based on environmental factors and floristic composition, the dry forests of Colombia are clustered in three distinctive groups, with high species turnover across and within regions, as reported for other TDF regions of the Neotropics. Widely distributed TDF species were found to be generalists favored by forest disturbance and the early successional stages of dry forests. On the other hand, TDF fragments were not only small in size, but highly irregular in shape in all regions, and comprising mostly early and intermediate successional stages, with very little mature forest left at the national level. At all sites, we detected at least seven anthropogenic disturbances with agriculture, cattle ranching and human infrastructure being the most pressing disturbances throughout the country. Thus, although environmental factors and floristic composition of dry forests vary across regions at the national level, dry forests are equally threatened by deforestation, degradation and anthropogenic pressures all over the country, making TDFs a top priority for conservation in Colombia. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Research Letters, ISSN:1748-9318, Vol. 13 (2018)
dc.relation.urihttp://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aaad74/pdf
dc.subjectBiodiversity
dc.subjectDeforestation
dc.subjectDrought
dc.subjectEcology
dc.subjectSoils
dc.subjectAnthropogenic Disturbance
dc.subjectAnthropogenic Pressures
dc.subjectBiogeographical Regions
dc.subjectEcological Integrity
dc.subjectEnvironmental Factors
dc.subjectEnvironmental Heterogeneity
dc.subjectFloristic Compositions
dc.subjectHuman Infrastructure
dc.subjectSoil Conservation
dc.subjectAnthropogenic Effect
dc.subjectBiodiversity
dc.subjectBiogeographical Region
dc.subjectBiome
dc.subjectCattle
dc.subjectConservation Status
dc.subjectDeforestation
dc.subjectDisturbance
dc.subjectDry Forest
dc.subjectEnvironmental Factor
dc.subjectHeterogeneity
dc.subjectNeotropical Region
dc.subjectPrecipitation (Climatology)
dc.subjectRainfall
dc.subjectSeasonality
dc.subjectSuccession
dc.subjectTropical Forest
dc.subjectTurnover
dc.subjectColombia
dc.subjectBos
dc.subjectLa biodiversidad
dc.subjectDeforestación
dc.subjectSequía
dc.subjectEcología
dc.subject.ddcBotánica 
dc.subject.lembLa biodiversidad
dc.subject.lembDeforestación
dc.subject.lembSequía
dc.subject.lembEcología
dc.titleDisentangling the environmental heterogeneity, floristic distinctiveness and current threats of tropical dry forests in Colombia
dc.typearticle
dc.subject.keywordAnthropogenic pressures
dc.subject.keywordClimate
dc.subject.keywordForest fragments
dc.subject.keywordSoils
dc.subject.keywordFloristic composition
dc.subject.keywordSuccessional stages
dc.subject.keywordTropical dry forest
dc.rights.accesRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.spaArtículo
dc.rights.accesoAbierto (Texto Completo)
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.source.bibliographicCitationBerry, J.K., (2007) Map Analysis: Understanding Spatial Patterns and Relationships, p. 224. , (San Francisco, CA: GeoTec Media)
dc.creator.googleGonzález-M, Roy
dc.creator.googleGarcía, Hernando
dc.creator.googleIsaacs, Paola
dc.creator.googleCuadros, Hermes
dc.creator.googleLópez-Camacho, Rene
dc.creator.googleRodríguez, Nelly
dc.creator.googlePerez, Karen
dc.creator.googleMijares, Francisco
dc.creator.googleCastano-Naranjo, Alejandro
dc.creator.googleJurado, Ruben
dc.creator.googleIdarraga-Piedrahíta, Alvaro
dc.creator.googleRojas, Alicia
dc.creator.googleVergara, Hernando
dc.creator.googlePizano, Camila
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1748-9326/aaad74


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