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dc.creatorGarcía-Hermoso A. 
dc.creatorCavero-Redondo I. 
dc.creatorRamírez-Vélez R. 
dc.creatorRuiz J.R. 
dc.creatorOrtega F.B. 
dc.creatorLee D.-C. 
dc.creatorMartínez-Vizcaíno V. 
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-25T23:58:02Z
dc.date.available2020-05-25T23:58:02Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.identifier.issn1532821X
dc.identifier.issn00039993
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/22789
dc.description.abstract"Objectives: The aims of the present systematic review and meta-analysis were to determine the relationship between muscular strength and all-cause mortality risk and to examine the sex-specific impact of muscular strength on all-cause mortality in an apparently healthy population. Data Sources: Two authors systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and SPORTDiscus databases and conducted manual searching of reference lists of selected articles. Study Selection: Eligible cohort studies were those that examined the association of muscular strength with all-cause mortality in an apparently healthy population. The hazard ratio (HR) estimates with 95% confidence interval (CI) were pooled by using random effects meta-analysis models after assessing heterogeneity across studies. Data Extraction: Two authors independently extracted data. Data Synthesis: Thirty-eight studies with 1,907,580 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The included studies had a total of 63,087 deaths. Higher levels of handgrip strength were associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality (HR=0.69; 95% CI, 0.64-0.74) compared with lower muscular strength, with a slightly stronger association in women (HR=0.60; 95% CI, 0.51-0.69) than men (HR=0.69; 95% CI, 0.62-0.77) (all P less than .001). Also, adults with higher levels of muscular strength, as assessed by knee extension strength test, had a 14% lower risk of death (HR=0.86: 95% CI, 0.80-0.93; P less than .001) compared with adults with lower muscular strength. Conclusions: Higher levels of upper- and lower-body muscular strength are associated with a lower risk of mortality in adult population, regardless of age and follow-up period. Muscular strength tests can be easily performed to identify people with lower muscular strength and, consequently, with an increased risk of mortality. © 2018 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine"
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN:1532821X, 00039993, Vol.99, No.10 (2018); pp. 2100-2113.e5
dc.relation.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85044726129&doi=10.1016%2fj.apmr.2018.01.008&partnerID=40&md5=d3a5c1aca0d70bada4c050cab2d8cad4
dc.sourceinstname:Universidad del Rosario
dc.sourcereponame:Repositorio Institucional EdocUR
dc.titleMuscular Strength as a Predictor of All-Cause Mortality in an Apparently Healthy Population: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Data From Approximately 2 Million Men and Women
dc.typearticle
dc.publisherW.B. Saunders
dc.subject.keywordAdult
dc.subject.keywordAll cause mortality
dc.subject.keywordArticle
dc.subject.keywordCohort analysis
dc.subject.keywordControlled study
dc.subject.keywordData extraction
dc.subject.keywordData synthesis
dc.subject.keywordDeath
dc.subject.keywordEmbase
dc.subject.keywordFemale
dc.subject.keywordFollow up
dc.subject.keywordGrip strength
dc.subject.keywordHazard ratio
dc.subject.keywordHuman
dc.subject.keywordKnee
dc.subject.keywordMale
dc.subject.keywordMedline
dc.subject.keywordMeta analysis
dc.subject.keywordMortality risk
dc.subject.keywordMuscle strength
dc.subject.keywordRisk assessment
dc.subject.keywordSystematic review
dc.subject.keywordAged
dc.subject.keywordCause of death
dc.subject.keywordHealth survey
dc.subject.keywordMiddle aged
dc.subject.keywordMortality
dc.subject.keywordMuscle disease
dc.subject.keywordMuscle strength
dc.subject.keywordPathophysiology
dc.subject.keywordPhysiology
dc.subject.keywordProportional hazards model
dc.subject.keywordSex ratio
dc.subject.keywordAdult
dc.subject.keywordAged
dc.subject.keywordCause of death
dc.subject.keywordCohort studies
dc.subject.keywordFemale
dc.subject.keywordHumans
dc.subject.keywordMale
dc.subject.keywordMiddle aged
dc.subject.keywordMuscle strength
dc.subject.keywordMuscular diseases
dc.subject.keywordPopulation surveillance
dc.subject.keywordProportional hazards models
dc.subject.keywordSex distribution
dc.subject.keywordDeath
dc.subject.keywordHand strength
dc.subject.keywordLeg strength
dc.subject.keywordMuscles
dc.rights.accesRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.spaArtículo
dc.rights.accesoAbierto (Texto Completo)
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2018.01.008
dc.relation.citationEndPage2113.e5
dc.relation.citationIssueNo. 10
dc.relation.citationStartPage2100
dc.relation.citationTitleArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
dc.relation.citationVolumeVol. 99


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